Project Spotlight: Madison Reed

Madison Reed is the design of a new concept prototype consisting of the development of a brick and mortar Color Bar that challenges the typical ‘salon’. The design goals were to translate the success of their online retail shop into a physical space that redefines the salon experience, leading with efficiency and empowerment. This new concept design would then be rolled out across the country in spaces ranging from 1500-3000SF including a color bar, a shampoo room, a self-dry vanity area and retail as part of the program.  

From the moment a client walks through the door, the notion of ‘salon’ has been challenged every step of the way from the no-smell color treatment to the living room-like retail area. The color bar has an open layout, where most vanities do not include a mirror. This allows for more human interaction, attention to products on display and a grand reveal moment at the end of the process. Hair color is mixed directly in front of the client allowing them to experience and understand every part of the process. A floating vanity finished in a soft wood along with individual mirrors provide a semi-private area to dry and style hair before emerging back into the world with freshly colored hair.

Madison Reed is exactly the kind of project we love – partnering with a client who is intentionally trying to disrupt an industry and create something entirely new and ownable. We were able to successfully achieve this new un-salon environment by rethinking what is otherwise a typical layout and floor. Instead of placing hair stations along a wall with a mirror, we faced them towards each other and removed the mirror. Directly behind the bar is a mixing station where the product is mixed right in front of the client. This level of transparency redefines traditional salon coloring and brings the custom product right to the client, allowing them to envision themselves coloring their own hair at home in between Color Bar appointments. This design of the space and flow of the users reinforce this omni-channel approach that is key to Madison Reed.  

HHA Softball

Another great season for the RAMSA HHA softball team! Every year we compete with other architecture firms in a fun but competitive game of softball. Our team was doing great with a big lead over the other firms which lead us to the finals to play against SOM (Skidmore, Owings &Merrill). We headed to the finals starting off with a big win, but unfortunately lost our edge after 3 games. Though we didn’t win the big title we played our hearts out, and worked hard as a team. No matter how far behind we were, we never gave up! Good job Team!

What We’re Loving!

DVELAS

What’s your memory for summer? Lazy afternoons,  golden sand beaches,  lounge chairs,  white sails over blue water…  Do you ever wonder where the used sails go?

As architectural designers who is always looking for new way to use material, we would love to introduce this contract furniture brand – DVELAS.

DVELAS started as a creative reaction to reuse the huge quantity of material thrown away by the sailing industry. Material, which is not apt for sailing but which possesses excellent qualities in terms of durability and resistance. The models in the contemporary furniture collection reclaim the sculptural form of the sail and they use as inspiration, the rigging techniques, technology and the making of the professional sailing makers. DVELAS avoids using the material as a lining or upholstery, on the contrary, the idea is that the material stays in tension, working the same way as when it was used for sailing, giving back this way its dignity even though the sail has been taken into parts.”

If you love the idea that your furniture is “one of a kind” or “have a story behind it”,  you will love this “upcycling concept” furniture brand. “Each sail is used to produce a limited series of products, and all of them are tagged with an inscription that provides information regarding the sail ́s origins: the port it comes from, the ship, the type o sail, the original manufacturer and its numbering edition.”